shim


EQUIDAD DE GÉNERO
IGUALDAD Y EQUIDAD EN DERECHOS HUMANOS


26 de Julio, 2006


GENDERIT.ORG EDITION: FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION &

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Today's Topics:

   1. GENDERIT.ORG EDITION: FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION &INFORMATION
      (Lenka Simerska)

Message: 1
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2006 13:36:17 +0200
From: Lenka Simerska <lenka@apcwomen.org>
Subject: [Beijing+10] GENDERIT.ORG EDITION: FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION &
INFORMATION
To: iac2@lyris.ids.ac.uk, beijing+10@neww.org.pl
Message-ID: <44C60231.3080900@apcwomen.org>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-2; format=flowed

-----------------------------------------------
**PLEASE DISSEMINATE WIDELY**
(apologies for cross-posting)
-----------------------------------------------
**GENDERIT.ORG EDITION: FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION & INFORMATION**
-----------------------------------------------
I. Small Thoughts Around:
* Freedom of Expression & Information
II. New Articles:
*Community radios and feminist voices against repression in Brazil
*Tools for Communication Rights in Malaysia
*Culture, local traditions, and taboo - Challenges to the full
expression of women's voices
*A 'Women's Commons'? An Exploratory Dialogue on the Potential of the
Knowledge Commons for Women
*Will women really benefit from the digital revolution?
III. Featured Resources:
*Access Denied: The Impact of Internet Filtering Software on the
Lesbian and Gay [version 2.0.]
* The Media Freedom Internet Cookbook
* Gender Harassment on the Internet
IV. Call for Contributors
V. New Features

--- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
I. SMALL THOUGHTS AROUND...
*Freedom of Expression & Information*

World Press Freedom Day was celebrated on 3rd of May. Yet this year
alone, 21 individuals all over the world have been killed because of
their work as journalists, and many more are missing (Committee to
Project Journalists). As new digital communications technologies enable
new opportunities for the creation, expression and dissemination of
news and perspectives, these spaces are not invincible from the policing of
State and other equally impactful, but often submerged, socio-political
norms. GenderIT.org explores the gender dimension of freedoms of the
freedoms of expression and information.

This edition has been difficult in coming. We arranged for an interview
between guest writer and ICTs advocate, Katrin Verclas, with Manal
Hassan, a prominent communications rights activist based in Egypt. This
was also aimed to be in support of Alaa Abdel Fatah, her partner and
also active blogger on freedom of speech, who was detained together
with more than 300 activists during a peaceful protest on 7th May 2006. They
were arrested under the Egyptian Emergency Laws allows for 15 days
detention without trial that can be indefinitely renewed. More than a
month later, and after a third renewal of the 15 days detention, Alaa
is freed and continues to blog with Manal in follow-up of the other
activists still in detention [http://www.manalaa.net/].

On 12 June 2006, several thousand participants in a peaceful women's
rights protest who demanded changes to family laws and legal
discrimination against women in Tehran faced extreme violence. A large
number of police and security forces arrived at the scene, and ended
the protest by attacking the crowd with batons, and pepper gas. According
to the spokesperson for Ministry of Justice , 70 persons were arrested
during the course of this protest. However, this does not include the
arrests that happened prior to the protest, where women's rights
activists, student activists and also bloggers were summoned to court
and interrogated. Since then, others have been summoned for
interrogation by phone or in writing, including Sussan T, an active
women's rights and ICTs advocate from Iran. We contacted Sussan to help
render visible the situation that women rights activists are currently
facing in Iran, and to issue a call for support.

Understandably, at such critical moments, finding time and resources to
write or engage in interviews is difficult. Prioritising the urgency of
these two events, genderIT.org decided to postpone the edition for a
month while attempting to continue our contact with both Manal and
Sussan. It has been a troubled month of silence.

These two events demonstrate louder than ever that the spaces for us to
freely speak our minds, opine our thoughts, access information and
engage in democratic processes is narrowing. As such, this edition is
also a call for the renewal of commitment towards these fundamental
freedoms.

For more information about the situation in Iran, please visit:
[http://www.wluml.org/english/actionsfulltxt.shtml?cmd%5B156%5D=i-156-538618.]

For the status of the internet in Iran, see: "Access is denied: a
report on the status of the internet in Iran"
[http://www.genderit.org/en/index.shtml?apc=r90480-e91926-1]

--- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
II. NEW ARTICLES
*Community radios and feminist voices against repression in Brazil*
The repression against community radios in Brazil reaches important
social projects and initiatives such as Novo Ar - a community
association and radio station led by Gra?a Rocha. In this interview to
GenderIT, Gra?a provides details about the repression that Brazilian
community radios experience and highlights the critical role that women
play in the radio and in the community: "women resist better. Here in
Novo Ar, women are the majority -- and although we feel exhausted
sometimes, we never give up, we keep struggling".
http://www.genderit.org/en/index.shtml?w=a&x=94794

* Tools for Communication Rights in Malaysia*
Jac sm Kee speaks with one of the most vocal media and communication
rights advocate in Malaysia, Sonia Randhawa, through an online
messenger platform about motivations, communication technologies, rights,
democracy, tactics and gender. Sonia currently sits as the Executive
Director of the Centre for Independent Journalism (CIJ). Apart from
conducting regular trainings on independent media and communications
strategies, CIJ is also developing community radio programmes that
innovatively combine "old" and "new" technologies -- radio and the
internet -- through Radiq Radio.
http://www.genderit.org/en/index.shtml?w=a&x=94522

*Culture, local traditions, and taboo - Challenges to the full
expression of women's voices*
Popular communicators that work in community radio-telecentres in
different states of Brazil talk about their achievements and
apprehensions concerning the complete freedom to express themselves. As
members of the Cyberela Network (Red Cyberela) developed by the
feminist organisation Cemina, the communicators explain the reasons behind their
self-censorship and how they gradually overcome taboos and prejudices
through their work with microphones and screens.
http://www.genderit.org/en/index.shtml?apc=a--e94775-1&x=94775

*A Women's 'Commons'? An Exploratory Dialogue on the Potential of the
Knowledge Commons for Women*
The idea of the 'commons' has been contestedly understood as being both
a principle of understanding content and creative products, and a
community that supports the sharing of information and creative
content.
It is also directly linked with subverting current Intellectual
Property Rights paradigms, where ownership and control of information,
knowledge, and content has been commodified. So what exactly is so 'new' about the
'commons'? Looking at the four paradigms where ideas about the
'commons' are supposed to operate, perhaps it is possible to see if developments
towards a Knowledge Commons resonates with feminist tactics/agendas/isms.
http://www.genderit.org/en/index.shtml?apc=a--e94793-1&x=94793

*Will women really benefit from the digital revolution?*
The book "The Gender Digital Divide in Francophone Africa, a Harsh
Reality" written by Marie-Helene Mottin-Sylla has just been translated
into English by APC, the Association for Progressive Communications. On
this occasion, Sylvie Niombo, Deputy Coordinator of APC's Africa-Women
Programme, interviewed Marie-Helene on the content of the book.
http://www.genderit.org/en/index.shtml?apc=a--e94795-1&x=94795

Visit the collection of a wide variety of other resources and articles
related to this issue on the communication rights section:
http://www.genderit.org/en/index.shtml?apc=i90480-e--1

--- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
III. RESOURCES

*Access Denied: The Impact of Internet Filtering Software on the
Lesbian and Gay [version 2.0.]*
A survey of how internet filtering software, and ratings systems affect
the lesbian and gay community. "Access Denied" contains sections
analysing the legal, political and social implications of enforced
invisibility on the web. It also includes testimonials from lesbian,
gay, bisexual and transgender persons, who are those most directly
affected by the lack of access to important information via the web or
internet. The report offers recommendations for industry leaders on how
to make the internet both friendly and fair.
http://www.genderit.org/en/index.shtml?w=r&x=94799

*The Media Freedom Internet Cookbook*
The Media Freedom Internet Cookbook offers recommendations and best
practices, the results from the 2004 Amsterdam Internet Conference of
the OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media. Among others, it looks
at "The Role of Filtering Software in Internet Content Regulation", and
documenting the number of cases how the filters may 'accidentally'
censor websites, and educational materials regarding AIDS, drug abuse
prevention, sexual and reproductive rights, or teenage pregnancy.
http://www.genderit.org/en/index.shtml?w=r&x=94798

*Gender Harassment on the Internet*
The paper examines the nature and types of gender harassment occurring
on the net, including possible causes of this online offense. It also
explores whether online gender harassment rises to the level of an
actionable claim, and will examine some of the inherent problems in
pursuing such claims, as well as pursuing criminal charges against
offenders.
http://www.genderit.org/en/index.shtml?w=r&x=91153

--- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
IV. CALL FOR CONTRIBUTORS

GenderIT.org is *still* calling for contributors :)

If you have something exciting to share, or if we can help communicate
your event, campaign, insights and reflections to a wider audience,
please send us an email (jac AT apcwomen DOT org).

--- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
V. NEW FEATURES for GenderIT.org readers

GenderIT.org has recently launched a RSS feed, which stands for Really
Simple Syndication or Rich Site Summary. This function allows you to
receive the alerts about the latest content from the GenderIT.org
English or Spanish version of website straight to your computer as soon
as it is available online.

To subscribe to RSS feed for GenderIT.org
Articles:http://www.genderit.org/aa/view.php?vid=725&nocache=1
To subscribe to RSS feed for GenderIT.org
Art?culos:http://www.genderit.org/aa/view.php?vid=732&nocache=1
To subscribe to RSS feed for GenderIT.org Feminist Talk/Conversaciones
Feministas:http://www.genderit.org/aa/view.php?vid=688&nocache=1

For more details about what is RSS, why is it useful, and how it works,
see our help page: http://www.genderit.org/en/rsshelp.php

--- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
*CopyLeft. 2005 APC Women's Networking Support Programme (APC WNSP)*
Permission is granted to use this document for personal use, for
training and educational publications, and activities by peace,
environmental, human rights or development organisations. Please
provide an acknowledgement to APC WNSP.

------------------------------

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End of beijing+10 Digest, Vol 20, Issue 7

Publicado por Boletin Beiging+10 el 26 de Julio, 2006, 11:44 ~ Comentar ~ Referencias (0)


UNIFEM: ELIMINATE VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN

Los siguientes documentos son un solo tema, debimos empezar por el último y subir susesivamente, los pueden encontrar todos juntos en CATEGORIA: VIOLENCIA CONTRA LA MUJER que esta en este weblog. . Son 3 enlaces y el documento oficial. Gracias por su comprensión.

I´m sorry, the following links are of the document at least .Search CATEGORIA: VIOLENCIA CONTRA LA MUJER in this weblog. Thank you.

FRAMWORK - UNIFEM

Publicado por UNIFEM el 26 de Julio, 2006, 1:45 ~ Comentar ~ Referencias (0)


Proposals for Funds - Eliminate violence against Women

Proposals for Funds - Eliminate violence against Women

Publicado por UNIFEM el 26 de Julio, 2006, 1:37 ~ Comentar ~ Referencias (0)


Eliminate Viiolence against Women

Call for Proposals 2006

Publicado por UNIFEM el 26 de Julio, 2006, 1:24 ~ Comentar ~ Referencias (0)


UNIFEM: Prevención y Reducción de la Violencia contra la Mujer




Dear colleagues,
 
UNIFEM is pleased to announce the 2006 cycle of the United Nations Trust Fund to Eliminate Violence against Women in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). The Fund's primary goal is to identify and support innovative projects aimed specifically at preventing and reducing violence against women in CEE/CIS countries. In 2006, the Trust Fund will provide funding for implementation of existing laws, policies and plans of action to address violence against women at regional, national or local levels.


Please see the attached Call for Proposals for more detailed information on issue-focus, preferred strategies, format for submissions, eligibility criteria, where to send submissions, and criteria used by the Trust Fund in determining final selections. Please note that incomplete submissions will not be considered.
 
Proposals for the Central and Eastern Europe office (in English) should be sent to Raluca Popa, at bratislava.unifem@unifem.org; proposals for the CIS office (in English or Russian) should be sent to
gulya.muratalieva@undp.org by 1 September 2006.
 
Feel free to disseminate this e-mail to others involved in the elimination of violence against women who might be interested. We would appreciate if gender networks would circulate this e-mail and attached papers to their members.
 
Best wishes,
 
UNIFEM
Central and Eastern Europe

Bratislava, Slovak Republic

 

 

Kinga Lohmann
Executive Director

Karat Coalition
ul.Karmelicka 16/13
00-163 Warsaw, Poland
Tel/fax: (48 22) 636 83 07
www.karat.org, www.womenslabour.org

Ten list zosta³ przeskanowany przez program ArcaMail
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Publicado por UNIFEM el 26 de Julio, 2006, 1:13 ~ Comentar ~ Referencias (0)


Resolution 1325 (2000)

United Nations S/RES/1325 (2000)

S/RES/1325 (2000)

Security Council Distr.: General

31 October 2000

00-72018 (E)

Distr.: General

31 October 2000

00-72018 (E)

`````````

Resolution 1325 (2000)

Adopted by the Security Council at its 4213th meeting, on

31 October 2000

The Security Council,

Recalling its resolutions 1261 (1999) of 25 August 1999, 1265 (1999) of 17

September 1999, 1296 (2000) of 19 April 2000 and 1314 (2000) of 11 August 2000,

as well as relevant statements of its President, and recalling also the statement of its

President to the press on the occasion of the United Nations Day for Women’s

Rights and International Peace (International Women’s Day) of 8 March 2000

(SC/6816),

its resolutions 1261 (1999) of 25 August 1999, 1265 (1999) of 17

September 1999, 1296 (2000) of 19 April 2000 and 1314 (2000) of 11 August 2000,

as well as relevant statements of its President, and recalling also the statement of its

President to the press on the occasion of the United Nations Day for Women’s

Rights and International Peace (International Women’s Day) of 8 March 2000

(SC/6816),

recalling also the statement of its

President to the press on the occasion of the United Nations Day for Women’s

Rights and International Peace (International Women’s Day) of 8 March 2000

(SC/6816),

Recalling also the commitments of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for

Action (A/52/231) as well as those contained in the outcome document of the

twenty-third Special Session of the United Nations General Assembly entitled

"Women 2000: Gender Equality, Development and Peace for the Twenty-First

Century" (A/S-23/10/Rev.1), in particular those concerning women and armed

conflict,

the commitments of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for

Action (A/52/231) as well as those contained in the outcome document of the

twenty-third Special Session of the United Nations General Assembly entitled

"Women 2000: Gender Equality, Development and Peace for the Twenty-First

Century" (A/S-23/10/Rev.1), in particular those concerning women and armed

conflict,

Bearing in mind the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United

Nations and the primary responsibility of the Security Council under the Charter for

the maintenance of international peace and security,

the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United

Nations and the primary responsibility of the Security Council under the Charter for

the maintenance of international peace and security,

Expressing concern that civilians, particularly women and children, account

for the vast majority of those adversely affected by armed conflict, including as

refugees and internally displaced persons, and increasingly are targeted by

combatants and armed elements, and recognizing the consequent impact this has on

durable peace and reconciliation,

concern that civilians, particularly women and children, account

for the vast majority of those adversely affected by armed conflict, including as

refugees and internally displaced persons, and increasingly are targeted by

combatants and armed elements, and recognizing the consequent impact this has on

durable peace and reconciliation,

recognizing the consequent impact this has on

durable peace and reconciliation,

Reaffirming the important role of women in the prevention and resolution of

conflicts and in peace-building, and stressing the importance of their equal

participation and full involvement in all efforts for the maintenance and promotion

of peace and security, and the need to increase their role in decision-making with

regard to conflict prevention and resolution,

the important role of women in the prevention and resolution of

conflicts and in peace-building, and stressing the importance of their equal

participation and full involvement in all efforts for the maintenance and promotion

of peace and security, and the need to increase their role in decision-making with

regard to conflict prevention and resolution,

stressing the importance of their equal

participation and full involvement in all efforts for the maintenance and promotion

of peace and security, and the need to increase their role in decision-making with

regard to conflict prevention and resolution,

Reaffirming also the need to implement fully international humanitarian and

human rights law that protects the rights of women and girls during and after

conflicts,

the need to implement fully international humanitarian and

human rights law that protects the rights of women and girls during and after

conflicts,

Emphasizing the need for all parties to ensure that mine clearance and mine

awareness programmes take into account the special needs of women and girls,

the need for all parties to ensure that mine clearance and mine

awareness programmes take into account the special needs of women and girls,

Recognizing the urgent need to mainstream a gender perspective into

peacekeeping operations, and in this regard noting the Windhoek Declaration and

the Namibia Plan of Action on Mainstreaming a Gender Perspective in

Multidimensional Peace Support Operations (S/2000/693),

the urgent need to mainstream a gender perspective into

peacekeeping operations, and in this regard noting the Windhoek Declaration and

the Namibia Plan of Action on Mainstreaming a Gender Perspective in

Multidimensional Peace Support Operations (S/2000/693),

noting the Windhoek Declaration and

the Namibia Plan of Action on Mainstreaming a Gender Perspective in

Multidimensional Peace Support Operations (S/2000/693),

Recognizing also the importance of the recommendation contained in the

statement of its President to the press of 8 March 2000 for specialized training for

all peacekeeping personnel on the protection, special needs and human rights of

women and children in conflict situations,

the importance of the recommendation contained in the

statement of its President to the press of 8 March 2000 for specialized training for

all peacekeeping personnel on the protection, special needs and human rights of

women and children in conflict situations,

Recognizing that an understanding of the impact of armed conflict on women

and girls, effective institutional arrangements to guarantee their protection and full

participation in the peace process can significantly contribute to the maintenance

and promotion of international peace and security,

that an understanding of the impact of armed conflict on women

and girls, effective institutional arrangements to guarantee their protection and full

participation in the peace process can significantly contribute to the maintenance

and promotion of international peace and security,

Noting the need to consolidate data on the impact of armed conflict on women

and girls,

1. Urges Member States to ensure increased representation of women at all

decision-making levels in national, regional and international institutions and

mechanisms for the prevention, management, and resolution of conflict;

2. Encourages the Secretary-General to implement his strategic plan of

action (A/49/587) calling for an increase in the participation of women at decisionmaking

levels in conflict resolution and peace processes;

3. Urges the Secretary-General to appoint more women as special

representatives and envoys to pursue good offices on his behalf, and in this regard

the need to consolidate data on the impact of armed conflict on women

and girls,

1. Urges Member States to ensure increased representation of women at all

decision-making levels in national, regional and international institutions and

mechanisms for the prevention, management, and resolution of conflict;

2. Encourages the Secretary-General to implement his strategic plan of

action (A/49/587) calling for an increase in the participation of women at decisionmaking

levels in conflict resolution and peace processes;

3. Urges the Secretary-General to appoint more women as special

representatives and envoys to pursue good offices on his behalf, and in this regard

Urges Member States to ensure increased representation of women at all

decision-making levels in national, regional and international institutions and

mechanisms for the prevention, management, and resolution of conflict;

2. Encourages the Secretary-General to implement his strategic plan of

action (A/49/587) calling for an increase in the participation of women at decisionmaking

levels in conflict resolution and peace processes;

3. Urges the Secretary-General to appoint more women as special

representatives and envoys to pursue good offices on his behalf, and in this regard

Encourages the Secretary-General to implement his strategic plan of

action (A/49/587) calling for an increase in the participation of women at decisionmaking

levels in conflict resolution and peace processes;

3. Urges the Secretary-General to appoint more women as special

representatives and envoys to pursue good offices on his behalf, and in this regard

Urges the Secretary-General to appoint more women as special

representatives and envoys to pursue good offices on his behalf, and in this regard

calls on Member States to provide candidates to the Secretary-General, for inclusion

in a regularly updated centralized roster;

4. Further urges the Secretary-General to seek to expand the role and

contribution of women in United Nations field-based operations, and especially

among military observers, civilian police, human rights and humanitarian personnel;

5. Expresses its willingness to incorporate a gender perspective into

peacekeeping operations, and urges the Secretary-General to ensure that, where

appropriate, field operations include a gender component;

6. Requests the Secretary-General to provide to Member States training

guidelines and materials on the protection, rights and the particular needs of women,

as well as on the importance of involving women in all peacekeeping and peacebuilding

measures, invites Member States to incorporate these elements as well as

HIV/AIDS awareness training into their national training programmes for military

and civilian police personnel in preparation for deployment, and further requests the

Secretary-General to ensure that civilian personnel of peacekeeping operations

receive similar training;

7. Urges Member States to increase their voluntary financial, technical and

logistical support for gender-sensitive training efforts, including those undertaken

by relevant funds and programmes, inter alia, the United Nations Fund for Women

and United Nations Children’s Fund, and by the Office of the United Nations High

Commissioner for Refugees and other relevant bodies;

Member States to provide candidates to the Secretary-General, for inclusion

in a regularly updated centralized roster;

4. Further urges the Secretary-General to seek to expand the role and

contribution of women in United Nations field-based operations, and especially

among military observers, civilian police, human rights and humanitarian personnel;

5. Expresses its willingness to incorporate a gender perspective into

peacekeeping operations, and urges the Secretary-General to ensure that, where

appropriate, field operations include a gender component;

6. Requests the Secretary-General to provide to Member States training

guidelines and materials on the protection, rights and the particular needs of women,

as well as on the importance of involving women in all peacekeeping and peacebuilding

measures, invites Member States to incorporate these elements as well as

HIV/AIDS awareness training into their national training programmes for military

and civilian police personnel in preparation for deployment, and further requests the

Secretary-General to ensure that civilian personnel of peacekeeping operations

receive similar training;

7. Urges Member States to increase their voluntary financial, technical and

logistical support for gender-sensitive training efforts, including those undertaken

by relevant funds and programmes, inter alia, the United Nations Fund for Women

and United Nations Children’s Fund, and by the Office of the United Nations High

Commissioner for Refugees and other relevant bodies;

Further urges the Secretary-General to seek to expand the role and

contribution of women in United Nations field-based operations, and especially

among military observers, civilian police, human rights and humanitarian personnel;

5. Expresses its willingness to incorporate a gender perspective into

peacekeeping operations, and urges the Secretary-General to ensure that, where

appropriate, field operations include a gender component;

6. Requests the Secretary-General to provide to Member States training

guidelines and materials on the protection, rights and the particular needs of women,

as well as on the importance of involving women in all peacekeeping and peacebuilding

measures, invites Member States to incorporate these elements as well as

HIV/AIDS awareness training into their national training programmes for military

and civilian police personnel in preparation for deployment, and further requests the

Secretary-General to ensure that civilian personnel of peacekeeping operations

receive similar training;

7. Urges Member States to increase their voluntary financial, technical and

logistical support for gender-sensitive training efforts, including those undertaken

by relevant funds and programmes, inter alia, the United Nations Fund for Women

and United Nations Children’s Fund, and by the Office of the United Nations High

Commissioner for Refugees and other relevant bodies;

Expresses its willingness to incorporate a gender perspective into

peacekeeping operations, and urges the Secretary-General to ensure that, where

appropriate, field operations include a gender component;

6. Requests the Secretary-General to provide to Member States training

guidelines and materials on the protection, rights and the particular needs of women,

as well as on the importance of involving women in all peacekeeping and peacebuilding

measures, invites Member States to incorporate these elements as well as

HIV/AIDS awareness training into their national training programmes for military

and civilian police personnel in preparation for deployment, and further requests the

Secretary-General to ensure that civilian personnel of peacekeeping operations

receive similar training;

7. Urges Member States to increase their voluntary financial, technical and

logistical support for gender-sensitive training efforts, including those undertaken

by relevant funds and programmes, inter alia, the United Nations Fund for Women

and United Nations Children’s Fund, and by the Office of the United Nations High

Commissioner for Refugees and other relevant bodies;

urges the Secretary-General to ensure that, where

appropriate, field operations include a gender component;

6. Requests the Secretary-General to provide to Member States training

guidelines and materials on the protection, rights and the particular needs of women,

as well as on the importance of involving women in all peacekeeping and peacebuilding

measures, invites Member States to incorporate these elements as well as

HIV/AIDS awareness training into their national training programmes for military

and civilian police personnel in preparation for deployment, and further requests the

Secretary-General to ensure that civilian personnel of peacekeeping operations

receive similar training;

7. Urges Member States to increase their voluntary financial, technical and

logistical support for gender-sensitive training efforts, including those undertaken

by relevant funds and programmes, inter alia, the United Nations Fund for Women

and United Nations Children’s Fund, and by the Office of the United Nations High

Commissioner for Refugees and other relevant bodies;

Requests the Secretary-General to provide to Member States training

guidelines and materials on the protection, rights and the particular needs of women,

as well as on the importance of involving women in all peacekeeping and peacebuilding

measures, invites Member States to incorporate these elements as well as

HIV/AIDS awareness training into their national training programmes for military

and civilian police personnel in preparation for deployment, and further requests the

Secretary-General to ensure that civilian personnel of peacekeeping operations

receive similar training;

7. Urges Member States to increase their voluntary financial, technical and

logistical support for gender-sensitive training efforts, including those undertaken

by relevant funds and programmes, inter alia, the United Nations Fund for Women

and United Nations Children’s Fund, and by the Office of the United Nations High

Commissioner for Refugees and other relevant bodies;

invites Member States to incorporate these elements as well as

HIV/AIDS awareness training into their national training programmes for military

and civilian police personnel in preparation for deployment, and further requests the

Secretary-General to ensure that civilian personnel of peacekeeping operations

receive similar training;

7. Urges Member States to increase their voluntary financial, technical and

logistical support for gender-sensitive training efforts, including those undertaken

by relevant funds and programmes, inter alia, the United Nations Fund for Women

and United Nations Children’s Fund, and by the Office of the United Nations High

Commissioner for Refugees and other relevant bodies;

further requests the

Secretary-General to ensure that civilian personnel of peacekeeping operations

receive similar training;

7. Urges Member States to increase their voluntary financial, technical and

logistical support for gender-sensitive training efforts, including those undertaken

by relevant funds and programmes, inter alia, the United Nations Fund for Women

and United Nations Children’s Fund, and by the Office of the United Nations High

Commissioner for Refugees and other relevant bodies;

Urges Member States to increase their voluntary financial, technical and

logistical support for gender-sensitive training efforts, including those undertaken

by relevant funds and programmes, inter alia, the United Nations Fund for Women

and United Nations Children’s Fund, and by the Office of the United Nations High

Commissioner for Refugees and other relevant bodies;

8. Calls on all actors involved, when negotiating and implementing peace

agreements, to adopt a gender perspective, including, inter alia:

(a) The special needs of women and girls during repatriation and

resettlement and for rehabilitation, reintegration and post-conflict reconstruction;

(b) Measures that support local women’s peace initiatives and indigenous

processes for conflict resolution, and that involve women in all of the

implementation mechanisms of the peace agreements;

(c) Measures that ensure the protection of and respect for human rights of

women and girls, particularly as they relate to the constitution, the electoral system,

the police and the judiciary;

9. Calls upon all parties to armed conflict to respect fully international law

applicable to the rights and protection of women and girls, especially as civilians, in

particular the obligations applicable to them under the Geneva Conventions of 1949

and the Additional Protocols thereto of 1977, the Refugee Convention of 1951 and

the Protocol thereto of 1967, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of

Discrimination against Women of 1979 and the Optional Protocol thereto of 1999

and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child of 1989 and the two

Optional Protocols thereto of 25 May 2000, and to bear in mind the relevant

provisions of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court;

10. Calls on all parties to armed conflict to take special measures to protect

women and girls from gender-based violence, particularly rape and other forms of

sexual abuse, and all other forms of violence in situations of armed conflict;

11. Emphasizes the responsibility of all States to put an end to impunity and

to prosecute those responsible for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war

crimes including those relating to sexual and other violence against women and

girls, and in this regard stresses the need to exclude these crimes, where feasible

from amnesty provisions;

12. Calls upon all parties to armed conflict to respect the civilian and

humanitarian character of refugee camps and settlements, and to take into account

the particular needs of women and girls, including in their design, and recalls its

resolutions 1208 (1998) of 19 November 1998 and 1296 (2000) of 19 April 2000;

13. Encourages all those involved in the planning for disarmament,

demobilization and reintegration to consider the different needs of female and male

ex-combatants and to take into account the needs of their dependants;

14. Reaffirms its readiness, whenever measures are adopted under Article 41

of the Charter of the United Nations, to give consideration to their potential impact

on the civilian population, bearing in mind the special needs of women and girls, in

order to consider appropriate humanitarian exemptions;

15. Expresses its willingness to ensure that Security Council missions take

into account gender considerations and the rights of women, including through

consultation with local and international women’s groups;

16. Invites the Secretary-General to carry out a study on the impact of armed

conflict on women and girls, the role of women in peace-building and the gender

dimensions of peace processes and conflict resolution, and further invites him to

agreements, to adopt a gender perspective, including, inter alia:

(a) The special needs of women and girls during repatriation and

resettlement and for rehabilitation, reintegration and post-conflict reconstruction;

(b) Measures that support local women’s peace initiatives and indigenous

processes for conflict resolution, and that involve women in all of the

implementation mechanisms of the peace agreements;

(c) Measures that ensure the protection of and respect for human rights of

women and girls, particularly as they relate to the constitution, the electoral system,

the police and the judiciary;

9. Calls upon all parties to armed conflict to respect fully international law

applicable to the rights and protection of women and girls, especially as civilians, in

particular the obligations applicable to them under the Geneva Conventions of 1949

and the Additional Protocols thereto of 1977, the Refugee Convention of 1951 and

the Protocol thereto of 1967, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of

Discrimination against Women of 1979 and the Optional Protocol thereto of 1999

and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child of 1989 and the two

Optional Protocols thereto of 25 May 2000, and to bear in mind the relevant

provisions of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court;

10. Calls on all parties to armed conflict to take special measures to protect

women and girls from gender-based violence, particularly rape and other forms of

sexual abuse, and all other forms of violence in situations of armed conflict;

11. Emphasizes the responsibility of all States to put an end to impunity and

to prosecute those responsible for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war

crimes including those relating to sexual and other violence against women and

girls, and in this regard stresses the need to exclude these crimes, where feasible

from amnesty provisions;

12. Calls upon all parties to armed conflict to respect the civilian and

humanitarian character of refugee camps and settlements, and to take into account

the particular needs of women and girls, including in their design, and recalls its

resolutions 1208 (1998) of 19 November 1998 and 1296 (2000) of 19 April 2000;

13. Encourages all those involved in the planning for disarmament,

demobilization and reintegration to consider the different needs of female and male

ex-combatants and to take into account the needs of their dependants;

14. Reaffirms its readiness, whenever measures are adopted under Article 41

of the Charter of the United Nations, to give consideration to their potential impact

on the civilian population, bearing in mind the special needs of women and girls, in

order to consider appropriate humanitarian exemptions;

15. Expresses its willingness to ensure that Security Council missions take

into account gender considerations and the rights of women, including through

consultation with local and international women’s groups;

16. Invites the Secretary-General to carry out a study on the impact of armed

conflict on women and girls, the role of women in peace-building and the gender

dimensions of peace processes and conflict resolution, and further invites him to

(a) The special needs of women and girls during repatriation and

resettlement and for rehabilitation, reintegration and post-conflict reconstruction;

(b) Measures that support local women’s peace initiatives and indigenous

processes for conflict resolution, and that involve women in all of the

implementation mechanisms of the peace agreements;

(c) Measures that ensure the protection of and respect for human rights of

women and girls, particularly as they relate to the constitution, the electoral system,

the police and the judiciary;

9. Calls upon all parties to armed conflict to respect fully international law

applicable to the rights and protection of women and girls, especially as civilians, in

particular the obligations applicable to them under the Geneva Conventions of 1949

and the Additional Protocols thereto of 1977, the Refugee Convention of 1951 and

the Protocol thereto of 1967, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of

Discrimination against Women of 1979 and the Optional Protocol thereto of 1999

and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child of 1989 and the two

Optional Protocols thereto of 25 May 2000, and to bear in mind the relevant

provisions of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court;

10. Calls on all parties to armed conflict to take special measures to protect

women and girls from gender-based violence, particularly rape and other forms of

sexual abuse, and all other forms of violence in situations of armed conflict;

11. Emphasizes the responsibility of all States to put an end to impunity and

to prosecute those responsible for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war

crimes including those relating to sexual and other violence against women and

girls, and in this regard stresses the need to exclude these crimes, where feasible

from amnesty provisions;

12. Calls upon all parties to armed conflict to respect the civilian and

humanitarian character of refugee camps and settlements, and to take into account

the particular needs of women and girls, including in their design, and recalls its

resolutions 1208 (1998) of 19 November 1998 and 1296 (2000) of 19 April 2000;

13. Encourages all those involved in the planning for disarmament,

demobilization and reintegration to consider the different needs of female and male

ex-combatants and to take into account the needs of their dependants;

14. Reaffirms its readiness, whenever measures are adopted under Article 41

of the Charter of the United Nations, to give consideration to their potential impact

on the civilian population, bearing in mind the special needs of women and girls, in

order to consider appropriate humanitarian exemptions;

15. Expresses its willingness to ensure that Security Council missions take

into account gender considerations and the rights of women, including through

consultation with local and international women’s groups;

16. Invites the Secretary-General to carry out a study on the impact of armed

conflict on women and girls, the role of women in peace-building and the gender

dimensions of peace processes and conflict resolution, and further invites him to

applicable to the rights and protection of women and girls, especially as civilians, in

particular the obligations applicable to them under the Geneva Conventions of 1949

and the Additional Protocols thereto of 1977, the Refugee Convention of 1951 and

the Protocol thereto of 1967, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of

Discrimination against Women of 1979 and the Optional Protocol thereto of 1999

and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child of 1989 and the two

Optional Protocols thereto of 25 May 2000, and to bear in mind the relevant

provisions of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court;

10. Calls on all parties to armed conflict to take special measures to protect

women and girls from gender-based violence, particularly rape and other forms of

sexual abuse, and all other forms of violence in situations of armed conflict;

11. Emphasizes the responsibility of all States to put an end to impunity and

to prosecute those responsible for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war

crimes including those relating to sexual and other violence against women and

girls, and in this regard stresses the need to exclude these crimes, where feasible

from amnesty provisions;

12. Calls upon all parties to armed conflict to respect the civilian and

humanitarian character of refugee camps and settlements, and to take into account

the particular needs of women and girls, including in their design, and recalls its

resolutions 1208 (1998) of 19 November 1998 and 1296 (2000) of 19 April 2000;

13. Encourages all those involved in the planning for disarmament,

demobilization and reintegration to consider the different needs of female and male

ex-combatants and to take into account the needs of their dependants;

14. Reaffirms its readiness, whenever measures are adopted under Article 41

of the Charter of the United Nations, to give consideration to their potential impact

on the civilian population, bearing in mind the special needs of women and girls, in

order to consider appropriate humanitarian exemptions;

15. Expresses its willingness to ensure that Security Council missions take

into account gender considerations and the rights of women, including through

consultation with local and international women’s groups;

16. Invites the Secretary-General to carry out a study on the impact of armed

conflict on women and girls, the role of women in peace-building and the gender

dimensions of peace processes and conflict resolution, and further invites him to

women and girls from gender-based violence, particularly rape and other forms of

sexual abuse, and all other forms of violence in situations of armed conflict;

11. Emphasizes the responsibility of all States to put an end to impunity and

to prosecute those responsible for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war

crimes including those relating to sexual and other violence against women and

girls, and in this regard stresses the need to exclude these crimes, where feasible

from amnesty provisions;

12. Calls upon all parties to armed conflict to respect the civilian and

humanitarian character of refugee camps and settlements, and to take into account

the particular needs of women and girls, including in their design, and recalls its

resolutions 1208 (1998) of 19 November 1998 and 1296 (2000) of 19 April 2000;

13. Encourages all those involved in the planning for disarmament,

demobilization and reintegration to consider the different needs of female and male

ex-combatants and to take into account the needs of their dependants;

14. Reaffirms its readiness, whenever measures are adopted under Article 41

of the Charter of the United Nations, to give consideration to their potential impact

on the civilian population, bearing in mind the special needs of women and girls, in

order to consider appropriate humanitarian exemptions;

15. Expresses its willingness to ensure that Security Council missions take

into account gender considerations and the rights of women, including through

consultation with local and international women’s groups;

16. Invites the Secretary-General to carry out a study on the impact of armed

conflict on women and girls, the role of women in peace-building and the gender

dimensions of peace processes and conflict resolution, and further invites him to

to prosecute those responsible for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war

crimes including those relating to sexual and other violence against women and

girls, and in this regard stresses the need to exclude these crimes, where feasible

from amnesty provisions;

12. Calls upon all parties to armed conflict to respect the civilian and

humanitarian character of refugee camps and settlements, and to take into account

the particular needs of women and girls, including in their design, and recalls its

resolutions 1208 (1998) of 19 November 1998 and 1296 (2000) of 19 April 2000;

13. Encourages all those involved in the planning for disarmament,

demobilization and reintegration to consider the different needs of female and male

ex-combatants and to take into account the needs of their dependants;

14. Reaffirms its readiness, whenever measures are adopted under Article 41

of the Charter of the United Nations, to give consideration to their potential impact

on the civilian population, bearing in mind the special needs of women and girls, in

order to consider appropriate humanitarian exemptions;

15. Expresses its willingness to ensure that Security Council missions take

into account gender considerations and the rights of women, including through

consultation with local and international women’s groups;

16. Invites the Secretary-General to carry out a study on the impact of armed

conflict on women and girls, the role of women in peace-building and the gender

dimensions of peace processes and conflict resolution, and further invites him to

from amnesty provisions;

12. Calls upon all parties to armed conflict to respect the civilian and

humanitarian character of refugee camps and settlements, and to take into account

the particular needs of women and girls, including in their design, and recalls its

resolutions 1208 (1998) of 19 November 1998 and 1296 (2000) of 19 April 2000;

13. Encourages all those involved in the planning for disarmament,

demobilization and reintegration to consider the different needs of female and male

ex-combatants and to take into account the needs of their dependants;

14. Reaffirms its readiness, whenever measures are adopted under Article 41

of the Charter of the United Nations, to give consideration to their potential impact

on the civilian population, bearing in mind the special needs of women and girls, in

order to consider appropriate humanitarian exemptions;

15. Expresses its willingness to ensure that Security Council missions take

into account gender considerations and the rights of women, including through

consultation with local and international women’s groups;

16. Invites the Secretary-General to carry out a study on the impact of armed

conflict on women and girls, the role of women in peace-building and the gender

dimensions of peace processes and conflict resolution, and further invites him to

humanitarian character of refugee camps and settlements, and to take into account

the particular needs of women and girls, including in their design, and recalls its

resolutions 1208 (1998) of 19 November 1998 and 1296 (2000) of 19 April 2000;

13. Encourages all those involved in the planning for disarmament,

demobilization and reintegration to consider the different needs of female and male

ex-combatants and to take into account the needs of their dependants;

14. Reaffirms its readiness, whenever measures are adopted under Article 41

of the Charter of the United Nations, to give consideration to their potential impact

on the civilian population, bearing in mind the special needs of women and girls, in

order to consider appropriate humanitarian exemptions;

15. Expresses its willingness to ensure that Security Council missions take

into account gender considerations and the rights of women, including through

consultation with local and international women’s groups;

16. Invites the Secretary-General to carry out a study on the impact of armed

conflict on women and girls, the role of women in peace-building and the gender

dimensions of peace processes and conflict resolution, and further invites him to

demobilization and reintegration to consider the different needs of female and male

ex-combatants and to take into account the needs of their dependants;

14. Reaffirms its readiness, whenever measures are adopted under Article 41

of the Charter of the United Nations, to give consideration to their potential impact

on the civilian population, bearing in mind the special needs of women and girls, in

order to consider appropriate humanitarian exemptions;

15. Expresses its willingness to ensure that Security Council missions take

into account gender considerations and the rights of women, including through

consultation with local and international women’s groups;

16. Invites the Secretary-General to carry out a study on the impact of armed

conflict on women and girls, the role of women in peace-building and the gender

dimensions of peace processes and conflict resolution, and further invites him to

of the Charter of the United Nations, to give consideration to their potential impact

on the civilian population, bearing in mind the special needs of women and girls, in

order to consider appropriate humanitarian exemptions;

15. Expresses its willingness to ensure that Security Council missions take

into account gender considerations and the rights of women, including through

consultation with local and international women’s groups;

16. Invites the Secretary-General to carry out a study on the impact of armed

conflict on women and girls, the role of women in peace-building and the gender

dimensions of peace processes and conflict resolution, and further invites him to

into account gender considerations and the rights of women, including through

consultation with local and international women’s groups;

16. Invites the Secretary-General to carry out a study on the impact of armed

conflict on women and girls, the role of women in peace-building and the gender

dimensions of peace processes and conflict resolution, and further invites him to

conflict on women and girls, the role of women in peace-building and the gender

dimensions of peace processes and conflict resolution, and further invites him to

submit a report to the Security Council on the results of this study and to make this

available to all Member States of the United Nations;

17. Requests the Secretary-General, where appropriate, to include in his

reporting to the Security Council progress on gender mainstreaming throughout

peacekeeping missions and all other aspects relating to women and girls;

18. Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

available to all Member States of the United Nations;

17. Requests the Secretary-General, where appropriate, to include in his

reporting to the Security Council progress on gender mainstreaming throughout

peacekeeping missions and all other aspects relating to women and girls;

18. Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

reporting to the Security Council progress on gender mainstreaming throughout

peacekeeping missions and all other aspects relating to women and girls;

18. Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

Publicado por United Nations S/RES/1325 (2000) el 26 de Julio, 2006, 1:05 ~ Comentar ~ Referencias (0)


Translate Resolution 1325.

FYI


From: WUNRN [mailto:wunrn@WHATHELPS.COM]
Sent: Friday, July 21, 2006 3:36 PM
To: WUNRN_ListServe@LISTS.WUNRN.COM
Subject: UN Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace & Security - Translations

WUNRN
UN Security Council Resolution 1325 on
Women, Peace & Security is attached.
IMPORTANT: Please click website Link to access subsite
translations and additional references.
 
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TRANSLATING 1325

WOMEN, WAR AND
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A CALL FOR TRANSLATIONS OF UNSC RESOLUTION 1325 ON WOMEN, PEACE AND SECURITY:
74 TRANSLATIONS NOW AVAILABLE
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WHAT TRANSLATION DO YOU NEED? WHAT TRANSLATION WOULD YOU PRIORITIZE?
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In February 2003, PeaceWomen began compiling existing translations and calling for and welcoming new translations of Resolution 1325. Thanks to individuals and organizations who have shared their translations with us, the number of available translations on PeaceWomen.org has increased, since February 2003, from 9 to 74.

If any of you have translated UNSC Resolution 1325, know of existing translations, would be interested in translating, or know of others who would, please contact us at: info@peacewomen.org

74 TRANSLATIONS AVAILABLE
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Albanian
AMHARIC       
Arabic,
* html
Armenian
Azerbaijani
BAHASA MELAYU/BAHASA INDONESIA       
Belarusian
Bosnian

(Fonts are required to read this translation)
Burmese   
Catalan   
Ciluba (DRC)
, html
Czech    
DANISH        
DARI            
DIOLA          
Dutch
English,* html
FILIPINO           NEW
Finnish
FONGBE     
French
Georgian
German
Greek 
Haitian Creole
HAUSA   
  NEW
Hebrew
HUNGARIAN          
 
Icelandic
Italian
   
Japanese
KACHIN (BURMA)   
    
KAREN (BURMA)    
    
KARENNI (BURMA)   
 
Kikongo (DRC)
, html
KINYARWANDA      
KIRUNDI      
Kiswahili (DRC), html
KISWAHILI (e. Africa)
Korean
(Fonts required)
kuki (burma)         
KURDISH-KIRMANJI      
KYRGYZ
       
LAHU ( BURMA)
     
Lingala (DRC)
, html
MACEDONIAN
          NEW
Mandarin*
MARATHI (INDIA)      
Ndebele  (ZIMBABWE)
 
Norwegian
PaO (BURMA)    
Persian/Farsi
Portuguese

PUNJABI           
RAKHAING (BURMA)     
Romanian
Russian
*
SERBIAN          
SHAN (BURMA)
SHONA          
SINHALA:
1 & 2     
SLOVAK         
Somali
 
 
Spanish*     
Swedish

TAMIL       
tetum (timor-leste)        
THAI          
TURKISH
   
URDU        
UZBEK       
VIETNAMESE      
WOLOF
YORUBA
      NEW

*Designates official UN languages


• Aymara (Bolivia, Peru)
Bari (Sudan)
• Dinka (Sudan)
• Hindi
• Igbo (Nigeria)
• Juba Arabic (sudan)
• Krio
(Sierra Leone)
• Nepali

• Nuer (Sudan)

• Shiluk (Sudan)





These languages have been identified as priorities for translation by women, peace and security advocates:

Achehnese (Acheh)
Acholi/Luo (Northern Uganda,South Sudan)
Bengali
Croatian
Embera (Colombia)
Hmong (spoken in Laos, Thailand, Burma, Vietnam, and Southern China)
Khmer (Cambodia)
Luganda (Uganda)
Malayalam (South Indian)
Mongolian
Nuer (Sudan)
Oshiwambo (Namibia)
Paez (Colombia)
• Pashto (Afghanistan)
Pidgin (Papua New Guinea)
Quechua (Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Northern Chile, Argentina, Southern Colombia)
Sangho (Central African Republic)
• Tajik
Wayu (Venezuela)
Wayunaiki (Colombia)
Xhosa (S. Africa)
Zande (Sudan)
Zulu (S. Africa)

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Publicado por Boletin Beiging+10 el 26 de Julio, 2006, 0:55 ~ Comentar ~ Referencias (0)


14 {totalItems} nuevos recursos en la página Género y Desarrollo del Development Gateway

Actualización de contenido - Género y Desarrollo en el Development Gateway.


14 {totalItems} nuevos recursos en la página Género y Desarrollo del Development Gateway
http://topics.developmentgateway.org/gender

1. Creating Partnerships to Prevent Early Marriage in the Amhara Region
2. How costly is it to achieve the Millennium Development Goal of halving poverty between 1990 and 2015?
3. Health and Development: Global Update
4. Team Director, HIV/AIDS & Development (HADU)
5. CulturalConnect: Young ethnic professionals under age 25
6. Female Condom: A Powerful Tool for Protection
7. SEAHIV publications knowledge base (former hiv-development.org)
8. UNDP - More Women Power in Parliament.
9. Issue 27 ? Sexual Violence in Conflict and Beyond ( Forced Migration Review).
10. Discussion Paper - Bangladesh Gender Profile.
11. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL Press Release - Poorest Women and Children Let Down by Discriminatory Health Services in Peru.
12. Sourcebook on Emerging Good Practice: Managing for Development Results Principles in Action
13. Helping Your Patients Decide: Making Informed Health Choices About Hormonal Contraception
14. Where Women Have No Doctor: A Health Guide for Women
-------------------------

1. Creating Partnerships to Prevent Early Marriage in the Amhara Region
http://topics.developmentgateway.org/gender/rc/ItemDetail.do?itemId=1067209
Pathfinder International is pleased to announce the publication of Creating Partnerships to Prevent Early Marriage in the Amhara Region. In the Amhara regional state of Ethiopia, 50 percent of girls are married before the age of 15, often suffering...
Contribuido por Mary Burket el 17 Jul , 2006

2. How costly is it to achieve the Millennium Development Goal of halving poverty between 1990 and 2015?
http://topics.developmentgateway.org/gender/rc/ItemDetail.do?itemId=1067118
Authors: Kakwani, N.; Son, H.H. Produced by: UNDP International Poverty Centre (IPC) (2006). PDF 32p. FROM ABSTRACT:"This paper proposes a methodology to estimate required growth rates, investment rates, and per capita foreign aid in US dollars in...
Contribuido por emmanuel Asomba el 14 Jul , 2006

3. Health and Development: Global Update
http://topics.developmentgateway.org/gender/rc/ItemDetail.do?itemId=1067126
July 2006, PDF 8p.
Produced by: hlsp Institute.
Content: "Improving aid effectiveness (page 1); Financing proposals (page 2); Africa (page 3); Health, HIV and AIDS (page 4); Reaching the Millennium Development Goals (page 7)."

Contribuido por emmanuel Asomba el 14 Jul , 2006

4. Team Director, HIV/AIDS & Development (HADU)
http://topics.developmentgateway.org/gender/rc/ItemDetail.do?itemId=1067163
The International Center for Research on Women (ICRW), a private, non-profit organization that conducts policy-oriented research focusing on gender and development issues is looking for a Director lead its HIV/AIDS and Development Unit (HADU). The...
Contribuido por D.A. Daniel el 15 Jul , 2006

5. CulturalConnect: Young ethnic professionals under age 25
http://topics.developmentgateway.org/gender/rc/ItemDetail.do?itemId=1067438
CulturalConnect is a U.S.-based Web site aimed at young professionals in four specific ethnic groups working to break down stereotypes imposed by family and society. Staffed primarily by volunteers under the age of 25, it publishes four culturally...
Contribuido por Charlotte Moser el 19 Jul , 2006

6. Female Condom: A Powerful Tool for Protection
http://topics.developmentgateway.org/gender/rc/ItemDetail.do?itemId=1067270
"Although the female condom has been on the market for more than ten years, the supply and adoption of this device, which protects against both pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, is still too low to have an impact on the AIDS epidemic....
Contribuido por Maribeth Lovegrove el 18 Jul , 2006

7. SEAHIV publications knowledge base (former hiv-development.org)
http://topics.developmentgateway.org/gender/rc/ItemDetail.do?itemId=1067276
SEAHIV publications knowledge base (former hiv-development.org)
Contribuido por Boban Kozarov el 18 Jul , 2006

8. UNDP - More Women Power in Parliament.
http://topics.developmentgateway.org/gender/rc/ItemDetail.do?itemId=1067310
UNDP's gender project 'Women in Politics' was launched on May 30th, 2006 at the policy advisory workshop Local Policies on the Way to Gender Equality'. The workshop aimed to build on policy recommendations prepared by civil society partners of the...
Contribuido por Anuradha Bhattacharjee el 19 Jul , 2006

9. Issue 27 ? Sexual Violence in Conflict and Beyond ( Forced Migration Review).
http://topics.developmentgateway.org/gender/rc/ItemDetail.do?itemId=1067315
Issue 27 ? to be published in November 2006 ? will include a feature section on sexual violence in conflict and beyond, exploring the challenges and opportunities for combating sexual violence in conflict, post-conflict and development recovery...
Contribuido por Anuradha Bhattacharjee el 19 Jul , 2006

10. Discussion Paper - Bangladesh Gender Profile.
http://topics.developmentgateway.org/gender/rc/ItemDetail.do?itemId=1067320
The Paper - Achieving Gender Equality Outcomes in Priority Sectors for German Financial Cooperation with Bangladesh has been published by KFW - ENTWICKLUNGSBANK in March 2006 and written by F. Shah, and M. Richen. It reviews the gender dimensions of...
Contribuido por Anuradha Bhattacharjee el 19 Jul , 2006

11. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL Press Release - Poorest Women and Children Let Down by Discriminatory Health Services in Peru.
http://topics.developmentgateway.org/gender/rc/ItemDetail.do?itemId=1067356
11 July 2006, Lima: In a new report, Amnesty International revealed that in Peru, discriminatory maternity and infant health services are letting hundreds of impoverished women and children die every year and denying many of them the right to an...
Contribuido por Anuradha Bhattacharjee el 19 Jul , 2006

12. Sourcebook on Emerging Good Practice: Managing for Development Results Principles in Action
http://topics.developmentgateway.org/gender/rc/ItemDetail.do?itemId=1067575
This "Sourcebook on Emerging Good Practice: Managing for Development Results Principles in Action" was released in March 2006. It compiles some 20 examples ? illustrations of how different groups in different circumstances applied the principles of...
Contribuido por Charlotte Moser el 21 Jul , 2006

13. Helping Your Patients Decide: Making Informed Health Choices About Hormonal Contraception
http://topics.developmentgateway.org/gender/rc/ItemDetail.do?itemId=1067618
Myths and misperceptions about risks associated with hormonal contraceptives can lead women to restrict their contraceptive choices without cause. Given that a woman?s contraceptive needs are likely to vary over time, any actual or perceived...
Contribuido por Maribeth Lovegrove el 21 Jul , 2006

14. Where Women Have No Doctor: A Health Guide for Women
http://topics.developmentgateway.org/gender/rc/ItemDetail.do?itemId=1067708
"Where Women Have No Doctor combines self-help medical information with an understanding of how poverty, discrimination and culture can limit women's health and access to care. Developed with community-based groups and medical experts from over 30...
Contribuido por Maribeth Lovegrove el 24 Jul , 2006


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Publicado por Development Gateway el 26 de Julio, 2006, 0:46 ~ Comentar ~ Referencias (0)


 
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